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Applied studies

Planetary Health

Biomimetic Smart Sensing Systems
Sense-Analyze-Respond (SANAR) is a biomimietic paradigm for sensor engineering at the systems level. a) In the brain, cortical circuitry drives perception-action cycles based on SANAR (modified from Fuster and Bressler, 2015[M1] ). b) Smart systems are based on data produced by sensors, which is then analyzed before an actionable response is taken. The conceptual diagram here shows one SANAR loop, which represents an intuitive point solution.

Planetary Health

Artisinal gold mining
We are collaborating with Drs. Velez-Torres and Vanegas at the Universidad del Valle (Cali, Colombia) to develop sensors for measuring mercury from illegal small scale gold mining. We are working with Afro-desecendant communities to establish a participatory monitoring program that links to public health risk models. Details can be found here
Herbicide misuse
We are collaborating with Drs. Velez-Torres and Vanegas at the Universidad del Valle (Cali, Colombia) to develop sensors for measuring herbicides from improper spraying of sugarcane fields. We are working with Afro-desecendant communities to establish a participatory monitoring program and implement hydroponic systems for improving food security and health. Details can be found here
Embryology and seed set
We developed a custom fiber optic sensor system for small molecules sensing. These sensors were used in a USDA greenhouse study of soybean heat stress (Gainesville, FL). For more information on the applied work see research page of Dr. Bernard Hauser.
We have applied this multiplexing device in plant physiology (embryology) for studying the effects of climate on soybean seed set (Chaturvedi et al 2014)
Marine biology
We have used the multiplexing oxygen sensor for studying a coastal biogeochemical systems known as a microbialite. For more details on microbialites see the research page of Dr. Jamie Foster.
Diel cycling in marine microbialites at various depths (Chaturvedi et al., 2014; Chaturvedit et al., 2017)
Food safety
Our group has developed low cost electrochemical sensors and handheld acquisition systems for detecting small molecules and bacteria important for food safety analysis. Sensors have been developed for targeting L. monocytogens, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, or biogenic amines in food products. 
Rapid biosensros for measuring pathogens or small molecules in food samples
(Sidhu et al., 2016)

Hypothesis-driven research

Plant stress signaling
We have applied a number of self referencing microsensors for monitoring stress response in plants. These-non invasive sensors have been used to monitor a wide range of targets (sugars, ions, hormones) in plant roots and leaves.
*A summary of the self referencing technique can be found here
Biosynthesis and accumulation of jasmonate (JA) regulates plant defense responses and organ development during insect herbivory. Our studies show that JA signaling also modulates root growth by reducing auxin transport in roots and altering stomatal conductance in leaf cells.
Yan et al (2015), Plant Journal; Yan et al (2016), J. Plant Growth Regulation
Keystone organism
We have developed a series of microsensors for studying stress signaling in environmental keystone species such as Daphnia magna.
Sensors for studying ecotoxicity in model animal and bacteria systems
(Stensberg et al., 2011; 2014; 
Microbial biofilms
We have developed non-invasive microsensors for studying physiological transport in microbial biofilms important to wastewater treatment and ecology.
Sensors for studying biochemical reactions in water treatment bioreactors
(McLamore et al., 2009; 2010)
Metabolic disorders
Microsensors were developed for monitoring animal tissue physiology for studying diabetes, specifically focusing on traditional medicines and functional foods.
Microsensors for profiling glucose/insulin flux in pancreatic tissue. Natural remedies (herbal teas) were compared to conventional synthetic drugs
(Wang et al 2016)
A full list of publications can be found here

Nanobiosensors for Planetary Health

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