Sensor development and material studies

Hybrid materials for sensing

Inorganic nanomaterials
We have conducted a number of comparative studies for hybrid carbon/metal nanomaterials. These studies show the optimum arrangement/architecture for electrochemical sensing applications.
developed a number of hybrid structures containing biomaterials (proteins, DNA) and transducer nanomaterials. These hybrid materials lead to significant improvement in sensor performance (sensitivity, limit of detection, response time, durability).
Fractal platinum/nanocarbon hybrid materials for electrochemical sensing

Taguchi et al (2016); Chaturvedi et al (2014); Vanegas et al (2014)

Bionanomaterials
We have developed a number of hybrid structures containing biomaterials (proteins, DNA) and transducer nanomaterials. These hybrid materials lead to significant improvement in sensor performance (sensitivity, limit of detection, response time, durability).
hydrogel nanocomposites
Burrs et al (2015)
Stacked nanoceria-enzyme
Chaturvedi et al (2014)
Stratified enzyme layers 
Vanegas et al (2015)

Smart Bionanomaterials

Together with Dr. Carmen Gomes (Iowa State), we developed a biomimetic stimulus-response structure for capturing pathogenic bacteria. The architecture and capture strategy are based on symbiotic bacteria-animal systems found in nature.

Stimulus-response polymer/aptamer materials for pathogen capture (McLamore et al., 2017; Sidhu et al., 2016)

Biomimetic entropic patterning (BEP)

Our lab has developed a millimeter scale patterning approach for fabricating handheld biosensors (proprietary information). These devices are used in a wide range of field studies. Contact Dr. McLamore for additional details

Biomimetic entropic patterning (BEP) for improving sensor performance (McLamore et al 2016)

Sensors from agricultural waste

We have developed a variety of sensors using agricultural waste materials. These value added products have been synthesized using environmentally sustainable methods.

Nanocellulose-anthocyanin composite prepared with residue from cabbage and wood pulp

Flexible carbon circuits
We created conductive plastic aptasensors for targeting pathogens by laser scribing graphene on polyimide. These flexible circuits are combined with portable potentiostats for rapid field analysis of small molecules, viruses and cells.
Carbon circuits are laser scribed on polyimide films for creating electrochemical sensors. This sensor platform is used for a variety of sensing applications related to soil health, drinking water, and food safety.
Paper electrodes
We fabricated conductive paper using nanocellulose and graphene ink for sensing small molecules or whole cells. 
Nanocellulose-graphene paper sensors for targeting small molecules (glucose) or pathogens (E. coli O157:H7)
(Burrs et al., 2016)
Food safety
Our group has developed low cost electrochemical sensors and handheld acquisition systems for detecting small molecules and bacteria important for food safety analysis. Sensors have been developed for targeting L. monocytogens, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, or biogenic amines in food products. 
Rapid biosensros for measuring pathogens or small molecules in food samples
(Sidhu et al., 2016)
Post hoc SVML
We have developed machine learning algorithms (support vector classification) for improving impedimetric biosensor analysis.
Chemosensory protein biosensor fabricated on conductive plastic for measuring oral biomarkers; support vector classification shown on the right.
(Rong et al., 2016)
A full list of publications can be found here

Nanobiosensors for Planetary Health

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